Protesters are run over by Maduro's armoured vehicles as gunfire breaks out, sending civilians running for cover after Juan Guaido calls for military uprising, sparking clashes with pro-regime troops

Video footage has emerged showing President Nicolas Maduro's troops running over anti-government protesters during clashes with the Venezuelan National Guard.
Armoured vehicles operated by soldiers loyal to the besieged president were seen ploughing into demonstrators in front of La Carlota base in Caracas.
Heavy gunfire crackled through the Venezuelan capital on Tuesday after opposition leader Juan Guaido called for a military uprising to oust President Maduro. 
In the clip posted online a group of protesters could be seen throwing missiles at a white armoured vehicle. As they launch the assault as second tank emerged from the left and mounted the central reservation of the highway, mowing down a number of people.
One person could be seen falling under the wheels as both vehicles drove off, leaving crowds to swarm around the injured person. 
Guaido urged protesters and members of the military to join what he called the 'final phase of Operation Liberty' in a video taken at La Carlota airbase in the capital Caracas while surrounded by heavily-armed soldiers.
The troops then set up defensive positions around the base before Maduro's forces arrived and opened fire with teargas followed by live rounds, according to witnesses.
Guaido claimed that Maduro had lost the support of the military, but the President said he had spoken with his officers who had assured him of their 'total loyalty'. 


Video footage captured the moment the armoured vehicle mounted the central reservation of the highway outside La Carlota air base in Caracas
Video footage captured the moment the armoured vehicle mounted the central reservation of the highway outside La Carlota air base in Caracas
The footage showed the white National Guard vehicle plough into demonstrators as they hurled missiles at troops loyal to Maduro
The footage showed the white National Guard vehicle plough into demonstrators as they hurled missiles at troops loyal to Maduro
Members of the Bolivarian National Guard supporting Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido reload their weapons during clashes on Tuesday
Members of the Bolivarian National Guard supporting Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido reload their weapons during clashes on Tuesday
Venezuelan soldiers who have backed Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido exchanged gunfire with troops loyal to President Maduro outside La Carlota airbase in the capital Caracas on Tuesday
Venezuelan soldiers who have backed Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido exchanged gunfire with troops loyal to President Maduro outside La Carlota airbase in the capital Caracas on Tuesday
Opponents to Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro confront loyalist Bolivarian National Guard troops firing tear gas at them outside La Carlota military airbase in Caracas
Opponents to Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro confront loyalist Bolivarian National Guard troops firing tear gas at them outside La Carlota military airbase in Caracas
Opposition demonstrators face military vehicles near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase
Opposition demonstrators face military vehicles near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase
An opposition demonstrator bleeds from his head as he is carried by fellow protesters after being run over by a Venezuelan National Guard vehicle on a street near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase "La Carlota" in Caracas
An opposition demonstrator bleeds from his head as he is carried by fellow protesters after being run over by a Venezuelan National Guard vehicle on a street near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase 'La Carlota' in Caracas
Bullets began flying after Guaido, who has been trying to oust Maduro for months with largely peacrful protests, called for a military uprising against him, claiming he had lost support of the army
Bullets began flying after Guaido, who has been trying to oust Maduro for months with largely peacrful protests, called for a military uprising against him, claiming he had lost support of the army
Guaido called on members of the public and soldiers to join him on the streets to oust Maduro in what he described as the 'final phase of Operation Liberty'
Guaido called on members of the public and soldiers to join him on the streets to oust Maduro in what he described as the 'final phase of Operation Liberty'
An opposition demonstrator throwing a tear gas canister during clashes with soldiers loyal to Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro after troops joined opposition leader Juan Guaido in his campaign to oust Maduro's government, in front of La Carlota military base in Caracas
An opposition demonstrator throwing a tear gas canister during clashes with soldiers loyal to Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro after troops joined opposition leader Juan Guaido in his campaign to oust Maduro's government, in front of La Carlota military base in Caracas
An injured man is helped during a demonstration in Caracas. Reports state that at least one person was injured during the clashes at La Carlota after Guaido called for mass anti-government protests backed by the military
An injured man is helped during a demonstration in Caracas. Reports state that at least one person was injured during the clashes at La Carlota after Guaido called for mass anti-government protests backed by the military
'Nerves of steel!,' Maduro said on Twitter. 'I call for maximum popular mobilisation to assure the victory of peace. We will win!' 
Anti-government demonstrators clashed with troops loyal to Maduro at the air base in the capital hours after opposition leader Guaido took to the streets in a bold and risky attempt to lead a military uprising against the embattled socialist.
The early-morning rebellion seems to have only limited military support, but it was by far the most-serious challenge yet to Maduro's rule since Guaido, with the backing of the U.S. and dozens of other countries, declared himself the country's interim president in January in rejection of a government he accused of stealing last year's presidential election.
The dramatic events began early Tuesday when Guaido, flanked by a few dozen national guardsmen and some armored crowd control vehicles, released a three-minute video filmed near a Caracas air base in which he called on civilians and others in the armed forces to join a final push to topple Maduro.
In a surprise, standing alongside him was Leopoldo Lopez, his political mentor and the nation's most-prominent opposition activist, who has largely been silent and unseen since he was detained in 2014 for leading a previous round of anti-government unrest. Lopez said he had been released from house arrest by security forces adhering to an order from Guaido.

Venezuela crisis: Which countries are supporting the opposition?

Support for Nicolas Maduro's regime comes from Russia, China, Turkey, Mexico and Iran, wheres the EU, United States, Canada, Australia and neighbours Brazil recognise Juan Guaido as leader of Venezuela
Support for Nicolas Maduro's regime comes from Russia, China, Turkey, Mexico and Iran, wheres the EU, United States, Canada, Australia and neighbours Brazil recognise Juan Guaido as leader of Venezuela
Supporting 'interim' President Juan Guaido: 
  • United States
  • Canada
  • United Kingdom 
  • Argentina
  • Brazil
  • Chile
  • Colombia
  • Costa Rica
  • Guatemala
  • Honduras
  • Panama
  • Paraguay
  • Peru 
  • Kosovo 
  • The EU 27 
  • Australia 
Supporting incumbent President Nicolas Maduro:
  • Russia
  • Belarus
  • Greece 
  • China
  • Iran
  • Cuba
  • Mexico 
  • Turkey  
  • Syria 
  • Bolivia 
  • Uruguay  

'I want to tell the Venezuelan people: This is the moment to take to the streets and accompany these patriotic soldiers,' Lopez declared.
As the two allies coordinated actions from vehicles parked on a highway overpass, troops loyal to Maduro sporadically fired tear gas from inside the adjacent Carlota air base.
A crowd that quickly swelled to a few thousand scurried for cover, reassembling later with Guaido to a nearby plaza.
A smaller group of masked youths stayed behind on the highway, firing rocks and Molotov cocktails in an attempt to storm the air base. Amid the mayhem, an armored utility vehicle drove at full speed into the crowd. It was unclear if anyone was hurt.
'It's now or never,' said one of the young rebellious soldiers, his face covered in the blue bandanna worn by the few dozen soldiers joining the 'Operation Freedom' insurrection.
Amid the confusion Maduro tried to project an image of strength, saying he had spoken to several regional military commanders who reaffirmed their loyalty to his socialist revolution. 
The events, playing out in the opposition's stronghold in wealthier neighborhood of eastern Caracas, appeared not to have triggered a broader military revolt.
Flanked by top military commanders, Defense Minister Vladimir Padrino Lopez appeared on national television and condemned Guaido's move to seize power as a 'terrorist' act that was bound to fail.
Meanwhile, Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza said the 'right-wing extremists' would not succeed in fracturing the armed forces, which have largely stood with the socialist leader throughout the past few months of turmoil.
'Since 2002, we've seen the same pattern,' he told The Associated Press, adding that most of Caracas was calm. 'They call for violence, a coup, and send people into the streets so that there are confrontations and deaths. And then from the blood they try to construct a narrative,'
Hundreds of government supporters, some of them brandishing firearms, gathered at the presidential palace, answering the call by socialist leaders to come to the embattled Maduro's rescue.
'It's time to defend the revolution with arms,' Valentin Santana, head of a militant group, said in a video posted on social media as he brandished an automatic rifle.
Guaido said the troops who had taken to the streets were protecting Venezuela's constitution and that in the coming hours he would release a list of top commanders supporting the uprising. Anti-government demonstrators gathered in several other cities, although there were no reports that supporters of Guaido had taken control of any military installations.
'The armed forces have taken the right decision,' said Guaido. 'With the support of the Venezuelan people and the backing of our constitution they are on the right side of history.'
As events unfolded, governments from around the world expressed a mix of support for Guaido while reiterating calls to avoid violent confrontation.
U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton, in a Twitter post directed at defense minister Padrino, said the armed forces 'must protect the Constitution and the Venezuelan people.'
Meanwhile, Spain's caretaker government urged restraint, while the governments of Cuba and Bolivia reiterated their support for Maduro.
'We hope with all of our strength that there is no bloodshed. We support a peaceful democratic process in Venezuela. We support the immediate holding of an election for a new president,' Spanish government spokeswoman Isabel Celaa said.
Men on motorbikes flee from gunfire in Altamira, Venezuela
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Protesters representing Juan Guaido were caught in the cross-fire and ran through clouds of tear gas in order to take cover
Protesters representing Juan Guaido were caught in the cross-fire and ran through clouds of tear gas in order to take cover
A military member and a man take cover near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase 'La Carlota' in Caracas
A military member and a man take cover near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase 'La Carlota' in Caracas
Guaido has based himself at La Carlota airbase in the capital Caracas (pictured, protesters nearby), where heavy gunfire was heard hours after his announcement
Guaido has based himself at La Carlota airbase in the capital Caracas (pictured, protesters nearby), where heavy gunfire was heard hours after his announcement
A solider loyal to Guaido aims his handgun over the parapet of an overpass near the La Carlota airbase in Caracas
A solider loyal to Guaido aims his handgun over the parapet of an overpass near the La Carlota airbase in Caracas
Tear gas canisters were fired at civilians and troops who had joined Guaido on Tuesday morning, before apparent clashes with Maduro's troops
Tear gas canisters were fired at civilians and troops who had joined Guaido on Tuesday morning, before apparent clashes with Maduro's troops
Guaido has been trying to oust Maduro for months using largely peaceful protests, but that changed on Tuesday as he announced an uprising against the President
Guaido has been trying to oust Maduro for months using largely peaceful protests, but that changed on Tuesday as he announced an uprising against the President
A large number of people on motorbikes gathered on a motorway overpass leading to the airbase before tear gas was fired, followed by live rounds
A large number of people on motorbikes gathered on a motorway overpass leading to the airbase before tear gas was fired, followed by live rounds
Soldiers who had defected to Guaido were seen setting up heavy machine gun posts on the overpass shortly before gunfire broke out
Soldiers who had defected to Guaido were seen setting up heavy machine gun posts on the overpass shortly before gunfire broke out
Venezuelan military forces fire tear gas in an attempt to disperse protesters at the airbase
Venezuelan military forces fire tear gas in an attempt to disperse protesters at the airbase
Troops loyal to President Maduro are seen gathered near the airbase amid clashes with those who have joined the cause of 'interim president' Juan Guaido
Troops loyal to President Maduro are seen gathered near the airbase amid clashes with those who have joined the cause of 'interim president' Juan Guaido
A protesters throws a stone at a vehicle of the Guardia Nacional which have largely remained loyal to Maduro during protests
A protesters throws a stone at a vehicle of the Guardia Nacional which have largely remained loyal to Maduro during protests
A member of the Bolivarian National Guard supporting Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido throws a tear gas canister
A member of the Bolivarian National Guard supporting Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido throws a tear gas canister
Security forces fire tear gas outside La Carlota airbase in Caracas
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Guaido, who has the backing of the US and most Western governments, has been trying to oust Maduro for months using largely non-violent protests.
American National Security Adviser John Bolton, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Vice President Mike Pence have since tweeted their support for Guaido, saying: 'The United States stands with the people of Venezuela.' 
U.S. President Donald Trump 'has been briefed and is monitoring the ongoing situation,' White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said. 
Meanwhile two of the key international allies of Maduro - Bolivia and Cuba - condemned what they described as a coup attempt by violent rebels.
Russian President Vladimir Putin, another key ally of Venezuela that has invested billions in the country's oil industry, was 'discussing' the situation with his top security team. 
Mexico expressed concern about an escalation in violence and called on both sides to seek a peaceful resolution through dialogue.
Protests appeared to be spreading around the country following Guaido's call, with the leader claiming that people in 24 states had come out to support him.
It comes after years of mis-management have left the country impoverished, wracked by inflation and food shortages, and following Maduro's 'victory' in elections that many decried as rigged.
Meanwhile hundreds of supporters of President Nicolas Maduro have gathered at a rally beside Venezuela's presidential palace, where security force members are deployed on the perimeter wall.
The Maduro loyalists have been chanting slogans of support and a man on a truck has handed out large posters of Maduro with the Venezuelan flag behind him. 
Guaido called on Venezuelans and the military to join him on the streets, as government vowed to put down what it said was an attempted coup.
In the three-minute video Guaido, speaking in the company of men in military uniform and opposition politician Leopoldo Lopez, said he was at the Caracas air base La Carlota.  
Soldiers who took to the streets would be acting to protect Venezuela's constitution, Guaido said. He made the comments a day before a planned anti-government rally.

'The moment is now,' he said, as his political mentor Lopez and several heavily armed soldiers backed by a single armored vehicle looked on.
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