Women's National Team has lost millions over last decade, US Soccer Federation president claims

The president of the United States Soccer Federation responded to the Women's National Team's equal pay lawsuit with a claim that the USSF has paid the women more over the past decade even though the team has lost millions of dollars overall, according to TMZ.

USSF president Carlos Cordeiro issued a statement challenging the narrative that players on the women's team are not compensated as well as the men, even though they have more on-the-field success.

"Over the past decade, U.S. Soccer has paid our Women's National Team more than our Men's National Team," a USSF fact sheet read. "From 2010 through 2018, U.S. Soccer paid our women $34.1 million in salaries and game bonuses and we paid our men $26.4 million—not counting the significant additional value of various benefits that our women's players receive but which our men do not."

Additionally, the USSF asserts that the women's team operates at a loss almost every year:
"From 2009 through 2019—a timeframe that includes two Women's World Cup championships—the Women's National Team has earned gross revenue of $101.3 million over 238 games, for an average of $425,446 per game and the Men's National Team has earned gross revenue of $185.7 million over 191 games, for an average of $972,147 per game. More specifically, WNT games have generated a net profit (ticket revenues minus event expenses) in only two years (2016 and 2017). Across the entire 11-year period, WNT games generated a net loss of $27.5 million."
"Nevertheless, U.S. Soccer does not view these as losses, but rather as an important investment in our Women's National Team and in the long-term growth of women's soccer," the fact sheet added.

The U.S. Women's National Team filed a lawsuit in March against the USSF claiming that women were consistently paid less than the men.
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