'You left us on the battlefield bloody and alone': Proud Boys leader arrested over Capitol riot slams Trump for failing to pardon him

 A leader of the far-right Proud Boys group lashed out at President Donald Trump, accusing him of abandoning him after he failed to get a pardon for storming the Capitol

Ethan Nordean, who describes himself as 'sergeant-at-arms' for the Proud Boys Seattle chapter, is among more than 400 others who have been arrested in connection to the attack on the Capitol. 

'Alright I'm gunna say it. F**K TRUMP!' the 30-year-old from Auburn, Washington, said over the messaging app Telegram.   

'F**k him more than Biden. I've followed this guy for four years and given everything and lost it all.' 

Nordean, like many Trump supporters, believed they would get a pardon from Trump after they sieged the Capitol building hours after the former president's rally calling on his fans to 'fight'.

Proud Boy Seattle chapter 'Sergeant-At-Arms' Ethan Nordean (right) on Jan. 6 as he and a group of compatriots walked toward the U.S. Capitol. He is charged with conspiring to impede Congress' certification of the Electoral College vote, obstructing an official proceeding, obstructing law enforcement during civil disorder and disorderly conduct

Proud Boy Seattle chapter 'Sergeant-At-Arms' Ethan Nordean (right) on Jan. 6 as he and a group of compatriots walked toward the U.S. Capitol. He is charged with conspiring to impede Congress' certification of the Electoral College vote, obstructing an official proceeding, obstructing law enforcement during civil disorder and disorderly conduct

Nordean (above) is seen entering the Capitol building. Facing a potential prison sentence, he later slammed President Trump, saying he misled and abandoned him

Nordean (above) is seen entering the Capitol building. Facing a potential prison sentence, he later slammed President Trump, saying he misled and abandoned him 

Prosecutors say messages Nordean sent through the app Telegram such as the one in which he criticized the president (above)  further implicated him

Prosecutors say messages Nordean sent through the app Telegram such as the one in which he criticized the president (above)  further implicated him


Nordean, also known as Rufio Panman, is charged with conspiring to impede Congress' certification of the Electoral College vote, obstructing an official proceeding, obstructing law enforcement during civil disorder and disorderly conduct. 


Federal prosecutors revealed the messages in response to allegations from Nordean's attorney that they were withholding potentially exculpatory evidence.

They are among 1,500 pages of Telegram messages, 43 pages of text messages and several hours of video footage prosecutors say they have uncovered during discovery that tie Nordean to the Capitol attack.

'He led us to believe some great justice was upon us... and it never happened, now I've got some of my good friends and myself facing jail time cuz we followed this guys lead and never questioned it,' he said in the message.

'We are not and always have been on our own. So glad he was able to pardon a bunch of degenerates ahis last move and s**t on us on the way out. F**k you trump you left us on the battlefield bloody and alone.'

Prosecutors said the messages only further proved that Nordean had broken the law. 

'Far from being exculpatory, when placed in context, these and other Telegram messages produced to defendant Nordean contain additional evidence of the criminal conduct,' prosecutors said in court filings. 

He and fellow Proud Boy Joseph Biggs are currently being held after a federal judge ruled in April that they were too dangerous to remain free.

In his decision, U.S. District Judge Timothy Kelly concluded that there are no circumstances which would be adequate to keep Ethan Nordean and Joseph Biggs out of jail. 

Nordean, like many Trump supporters, believed they would get a pardon from Trump after they sieged the Capitol building hours after the former president's rally calling on his fans to 'fight'.. Trump makes a fist during a rally to contest the certification of the 2020 U.S. presidential election results on January 6, 2021

Nordean, like many Trump supporters, believed they would get a pardon from Trump after they sieged the Capitol building hours after the former president's rally calling on his fans to 'fight'.. Trump makes a fist during a rally to contest the certification of the 2020 U.S. presidential election results on January 6, 2021 

Prosecutors say Nordean (above center) a 30-year-old from Auburn, Washington was a key instigator in leading his fellow Proud Boys in the Capitol riot

Prosecutors say Nordean (above center) a 30-year-old from Auburn, Washington was a key instigator in leading his fellow Proud Boys in the Capitol riot

Also known as Rufio Panman, a federal judge ordered Nordean be held in April after deeming him too dangerous to remain free. He is currently appealing the decision

Also known as Rufio Panman, a federal judge ordered Nordean be held in April after deeming him too dangerous to remain free. He is currently appealing the decision 

On the morning of January 6, prosecutors say, Nordean and Biggs, along with Charles Donohue, 33, of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and Zachary Rehl, 35, of Philadelphia, led more than 60 other Proud Boys to the Capitol while then-President Donald Trump was addressing supporters near the White House.

Nordean and Biggs also allegedly knocked over a police barrier, which Assistant U.S. Attorney James McCullough said sent a signal to their followers that violence was permissible.

'There can be no adequate safeguard against [either's] ability to mobilize his men in support of a new, unlawful objective,' McCullough wrote in court filings earlier this month.

He and other prosecutors urged Kelly last month to revoke Nordean and Biggs' release, claiming Nordean endorsed violence in online videos, criticized police and mobilized a '1776-style' revolt on encrypted message groups.

They also sought to detain Biggs, who describes himself as a Proud Boys organizer and allegedly forcibly entered the Capitol twice that day, managing to even reach the Senate Chamber, where then-Vice President Mike Pence was presiding.

Attorneys for Nordean and Biggs, however, challenged the notion that the two were leaders in the riot, in which nearly 140 police officers were assaulted, according to the Washington Post.

'Unless it is claimed that the defendants had a plan to topple the world's most powerful government in approximately one hour or less (without any weapons), immediately leave the scene without any law enforcement concern and then throw a carefree music party blocks from the scene of the world-historical crime, both of these contentions cannot be true,' David B. Smith, Nordean's attorney wrote in court filings.

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